The Nourishment Fund

The Nourishment Fund is a mutual aid fund that provides nourishing meals to community members in the Bay Area for free while supporting the women and non-binary chefs who cook these delicious meals.

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About

Nourishing others is a deeply rooted value of mine. The fund began with the simple goal to bring moments of joy to Black women while supporting & highlighting BIPOC-owned businesses in the community. We have since expanded our deliveries, partnering with existing organizations that have been supporting the Bay Area community. This includes providing meals for East Oakland Collective's community food distribution and supplying the dinners for Queer Arts Center's monthly team meetings.

 

Because nourishment can take so many forms, we deliver not only hot meals but also care packages with self-care items, grocery boxes with produce from local farms, gift cards to local businesses, and more. These deliveries are not charity; they are gifted in solidarity.

 

BY THE NUMBERS...

DIRECTING

$9,992
TO BIPOC-OWNED BUSINESSES

DISTRIBUTING

705
MEALS, GIFT CARDS & CARE PACKAGES

and counting...

Support the Nourishment Fund

Make a Financial

Contribution

1

Your monetary donations go directly towards supporting local BIPOC women-owned businesses and nourishing community members.

Venmo: @dana-plucinski

PayPayl: paypal.me/nourishmentfund

Donate Food

Resources

2

In-kind food and product donations are greatly appreciated and can be used to contribute to meals, care packages, and grocery distributions.

Email: dana@baydish.com

 
 

BIPOC WOMEN-OWNED

BUSINESSES SUPPORTED

SUPPORTERS

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NEWS & PRESS

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"The Nourishment Fund pays Black chefs to cook for Black women and nonbinary people who, simply, could appreciate a hot meal delivery. The free meals are delivered weekly by a team of volunteers, and Dana Plucinski, a food business publicist and the Fund’s organizer, hopes to enhance the packages with fresh baked goods, candles and other self-care items. She got the idea from the work of Rachel Cargle, whose Loveland Foundation raises money to set Black women and girls up with therapy sessions.

 

Food is also her love language, expressed often by dropping off meals to loved ones. 'It’s nice to be thought of,' she said. 'And it takes one more thing off the to-do list for the day.'..."

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Questions?

Contact me